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How To Buy a Diamond

 

Steven Kretchmer's Tension-Set™ Collection Rings

Steven Kretchmer’s  5 row pave Omega Round

Buying a diamond is often one of life’s most exciting events…and also one of life’s most overwhelming decisions. There are so many factors to consider, from size and cut of the stone to certification and price. Many people try to simplify the process and purchase diamonds online, without examining the stone in person– only to receive a diamond that does not meet their expectations. Fortunately, anyone can learn how to buy a diamond they’ll cherish for a lifetime, thanks to these helpful tips.

Claudia Kretchmer explains in the link below

http://www.thesocialstationnetwork.com/things-to-know-before-purchasing-diamonds/

Do Your Research

It’s a good idea to gather information online before you buy a diamond; however, with the wealth of information (both accurate and inaccurate) online, it’s very important to use only trusted sources. We recommend non-profit agencies like GIA (Gemological Institute of America) and the American Gem Society, both of which were created to protect the consumer.

Know the 4Cs

4 Cs with diamond

The 4Cs (Color, Clarity, Cut and Carat Weight) of a diamond identify the characteristics of the stone. A diamond’s color ranges from colorless (white) to yellow. Clarity describes the existence or lack of flaws or inclusions in a stone. Cut is the most important factor in how brilliantly a diamond sparkles, and a stone is given a cut grade based on its overall proportion, symmetry, and polish. Carat Weight describes the size of the stone. All four of these factors will determine the overall value of a diamond.

Check the Certification

It’s important to buy a certified stone from a non-profit lab, if possible, as it will offer the most accurate, impartial evaluation. Why is certification important? It is a professional, independent assessment of a diamond that proves the diamond seller is representing it accurately. A certificate is also used for insurance purposes. Think of a diamond certificate like a passport that identifies the qualities and characteristics of a unique stone.

Appraise the Situation

loupe and diamond

If you plan to insure your diamond, which is a good idea for any large investment, you’ll need to get an appraisal that verifies the current value of your stone. A diamond appraiser will evaluate your diamond and check that your certificate corresponds to the number that is laser-inscribed on your diamond. Do you have a stone you’d like appraised? Contact us and we’ll set up an appointment with our Certified Jewelry Appraiser!

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